Browsed by
Category: Salads & Vegetables

Smashed Potatoes with Smoked Paprika

Smashed Potatoes with Smoked Paprika

smashed potatoesMmm, good old potatoes. Always there when you need them. A bag of these spuds, regardless of color, size or shape, can seemingly rest for great stretches of time in a cool, dark pantry. And in the off-chance their dear eyes sprout? Pluck them off and you’re good to go. This recipe is based on one my mom has in her arsenal, and it’s a great trick of hers. I’m lucky to have her as the inspiration. So, if warm and cozy is still your game, as we tip-toe into February, then let these smashed potatoes fill your kitchen in the most comforting of ways.

Smashed Potatoes with Smoked Paprika

PREP TIME: 20 minutes
COOKING TIME: 10 minutes
SERVINGS: 4-6

  • Yukon gold potatoes, 2 pounds (or your favorite variety)
  • 1 tablespoon smoked paprika
  • 2 teaspoons granulated onion
  • 1 teaspoon granulated garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/4 cup or more of a fat to cook in, such as coconut oil, ghee/butter, lard, etc.

Bring the potatoes up to a boil, covered in water in a deep cooking pot. Allow to cook for 15-20 minutes, until not completely soft but mostly cooking through (pierce them with a fork and notice how easy it dives into the potato flesh)–cooking time will also depend on the size of the potatoes you’re using. Once cooked, allow to cool completely (these are nice to cook ahead of time and have on hand throughout the week for all sorts of culinary projects). When ready to serve, heat the oil in a pan oven medium-heat heat. While the oil is heating, combine the spices in a small bowl and mix. Place the potatoes in the oil and gently press them down until they’ve flattered and the skins have broken; you can use the bottom of a glass cup, a measuring or other prop to accomplish this smash! Once smashed, sprinkle half the seasoning mix on top, and continue to allow them potatoes to cook until their bottoms are deeply golden, about 4-5 minutes. Then, flip the potatoes, and sprinkle the remaining half of the seasoning on the potatoes as the other sides reaches peak goldeness, another 4-5 minutes. Remove from oil and serve immediately.

Maple Roasted Carrots

Maple Roasted Carrots

maple roasted carrots

A sweet, comforting side dish, its glory being the subtle sweetness imparted not only by the maple syrup, but also those lovely carrots. I worked on a farm once for a summer (ah, now I’m far enough away in years that I think any memory would be pure nostalgia from that time!) and I loved working in the carrots fields. We had a big crew and it was hard work, and long days, but there were different jobs required by the literal field. There was the person pitch-forking the ground, loosening the soil surrounding the carrots. The people following along behind,  crouching as they pulled the carrots to the earth and creating bundles of them. Everyone taking a second to look up when someone thrust a certain carrot into the air, remarking on its hilarious shape and thinking of the customers who would inevitably buy them. Finally, there were those who would pile up the carrots, grabbing the bundles laying on the dirt and stacking, stacking stacking. When they weren’t, maybe they were distributing handfuls of rubber bands. Farm work is an underappreciated art, and so tough on the physical body, and it was a privilege having that experience for those quick 6 months, when it stayed easy on my body and the commodity of my peers made any (ok, most) weather tolerable. Join this wanna-be hippie in honoring those carrots with this simple side dish, hmm?

Maple Roasted Carrots

  • 4 large carrots, or 6 smaller, peeled
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup (use honey if following SCD)
  • 1 tablespoon butter (use coconut oil if vegan)
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves, roughly chopped
  • sprinkle of sea salt
  • grind of black pepper

Preheat the oven the 400. Slice your carrots a 1/2 inch wide, at an angle if you’d like to be fancy. Place your baking dish in the oven with the butter in it, just briefly, so the butter melts but the dish doesn’t heat too much. Take out, add the maple syrup and carrots, and toss to coat. Sprinkle the thyme, sea salt and black pepper over, then pop in the oven for 20 minutes, or until cooked to your liking. Serves 4.

Save

Save

Crunchy Fermented Green Beans

Crunchy Fermented Green Beans

IMG_7671

Oh, lactofermentation. How simple you are, how amazing your benefits! Really, any vegetable can be fermented. This natural fermentation process provides a batch of green beans that snap and crunch with every bite–a perfectly refreshing and snarf-worthy way to get in all the good bacteria and live enzymes fermenting promotes.

Lactofermented Green Beans
roughly 1 cup of green beans, ends trimmed and longer beans cut in half
2 garlic cloves
1 teaspoon coriander seeds
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 teaspoon mustard seeds

2 cups filtered water
1 tablespoon sea salt
1 tablespoon whey (optional)*
1 pint size glass mason jar

Sterilize the mason jar and its lid by running through a hot cycle in the dishwasher, boiling in water (if your lid is plastic, do not put in boiling water), or cleaning with dish soap and hot water. Use clean utensils during this process and clean hands, too!

In a separate container, mix the water, sea salt and optional whey together until all are dissolved. Put aside. In a small bowl, add the garlic, coriander, red pepper flakes and mustard seeds. Use the back of a wooden spoon to gently crush the seeds and smash the garlic a bit. Then add the spices and garlic to the bottom of the sterilized jar. Begin to stand the green beans upright and pack them into the jar until you have just enough so that they’re all standing up against one another. You want them to be no higher than 1 inch below the top of the glass jar. This is so you may leave 1 inch of airspace at the top of the jar during the fermenting process, and also because you want the beans to be fully submerged under the fermenting liquid (brine). Once all your beans are packed, begin to pour in the brine until it just covers the beans. Push any down that try to float up when you add the liquid. Pour the liquid in until 1 inch of airspace is left at the top. If you need more liquid to do this, add some extra filtered water. Screw the lid on, place in a cupboard, and allow to ferment for 3 to 5 days. After this, store the beans in the fridge. They last for at least 6 months refrigerated.

*want to use whey, but don’t know where to get it? Yeah, you can’t buy it, but you can make it! Take 2 cups of whole milk yogurt, and place in a colander or strainer lined with a clean dishtowel. Put the colander over a bowl big enough to catch the liquid that drips from the straining yogurt. Put the whole thing in the fridge, and allow to strain for at least 2 to 4 hours, or overnight. Save the liquid that drains away from the yogurt, because this is the whey! You can put it in a mason jar with a lid and it should keep in the fridge for up to 6 months. The strained yogurt is now what you would consider Greek yogurt–extra thick and creamy! Eat it as you would any normal yogurt.

Save

Braised Kale with Lemon and Anchovies

Braised Kale with Lemon and Anchovies

kaleanchovey600
I’m an anchovy FREAK. I really noticed it when I was about 13 years old and went gaga for a certain restaurant’s Caesar salad. When I was 17 and saw Jamie Oliver throw anchovy fillets into some hot olive oil and watched them dissolve and flavor that oil, the freak got geek. When I ordered pizza with extra cheese and saw I could get anchovy fillets for a few cents more, I solidified the fact: anchovies. are. the. bomb. So when I put anchovies in butter, when I sneak them into persillade, when I feel happiness knowing there’s a tube of them in the fridge (perfection), and a tin of them in the cupboard (amaze), I revel in letting my freak flag fly. And then I remember–it’s really not that freaky at all. It’s incredibly wholesome, eating a tiny fish. It gives me all those tasty nutrients just like the big catches. I think that’s what keeps me coming back, what I realize–you crave what they can give you. There’s nothing fancy about this dish. There can’t be. It is what it is. Thank goodness.

Braised Kale with Lemon and Anchovies
1 head kale, any variety, stems removed and leaves roughly torn
2 tablespoons fat of choice (I used duck fat–butter, lard or coconut would be great, too)
1 tablespoon anchovy paste (or 4 anchovy fillets from a tin)
1 clove garlic, finely chopped and smashed
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
zest of one lemon
juice of one lemon

In a large skillet, heat your fat of choice over medium high. Add in the anchovies, stirring around the hot fat until the anchovies have melted and incorporated themselves. Add in the torn kale leaves, gently tossing as they wilt from the heat. Cook for about 2 minutes, then add the garlic, sea salt and black pepper. Turn the heat up to high and cook for another minute or two, until some of the kale leaves get crispy. Take the skillet off the heat, then add the lemon juice and zest. Toss to evenly coat. Serves 4. It might not hurt to sprinkle some toasted and finely chopped nuts over this, but I’m not in charge here.

Save

Curried Cauliflower Rice

Curried Cauliflower Rice

curriedcauliflowernormal

Oh, good grief! A recipe. And a very simple one at that. Somehow, the monthly post I had intended to create for December slipped past me. Ah, such is life! I hadn’t felt that certain intrigue from a recipe until this one and I just happened to find each other one cozy night a few weeks ago. I threw some spices together, a makeshift curry powder… I was hungry and not in the right mind. Hah! The lighting was glowing and soft–not so great for the harried attempt at a photo (it’s over on Instagram) As soon as I was done rushing together such a silly dish, it happened. The curried rice soothed whatever frenetic energy was buzzing through me. I slowed down. I appreciated the flavors. I felt like I was back, back to me. Funny how a food can do that, huh? I vowed I would recreate it, and so I have. Thankfully, let me tell you, it’s just as spicy and cozy as ever. Whew!

Curried Cauliflower Rice
1/4 cup coconut oil (or butter, or ghee, or fat of your choice)
1 tablespoon mustard seeds
2 tablespoons curry powder, of your own choosing (I like this iteration)
1 small head cauliflower, grated or pulverized (“riced”) in a food processor

In a large skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat. Add in the mustard seeds and allow to roast for about a minute, or until they gently begin to sizzle and pop. Stir in the curry powder, then add the riced cauliflower. Stir to incorporate all of the spiced oil and the cauliflower, turn the heat to medium-low, cover with a lid and allow to steam for about five minutes, maybe stirring once or twice during the process. Up to you! Serves 4 as a side.

Save

Braised Fennel with Lemon Zest

Braised Fennel with Lemon Zest

braisedfennel1000

Hmm, where does the time go? October came and went, and here the little blog was, missing an entry. I do have a confession to make–I’ve been cooking, and I’ve been posting, but it’s over on Instagram (gasp! sigh! the horror!). Give it a go, folks. Add me. Let’s be friends. Other news? I’ve partnered with Solcana Crossfit and will be talking up a storm over there about all things health and nutrition related.

But, let’s move on. We have fennel to discuss. If you haven’t been a fan of fennel in the past, might I suggest this preparation? Its powerful licorice-y/anise-y flavor when raw subsides into something delicate during this braise. I’d call it sexy, but I may just need to get out of the house more often.

Braised Fennel with Lemon
2 fennel bulbs
2 tablespoons cooking fat of your choice (butter, lard, tallow, coconut oil)
1/2 cup chicken stock
juice of one lemon
zest of one lemon
1 teaspoon sea salt
1 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper

Chop both fennel bulbs into quarters, and slice on an angle to remove the core from each quarter. Finely slice all fennel, either practicing your fine knife skills or using a mandoline set for a thin slice. In a large skillet, heat your fat over high heat. Add the fennel slices and sea salt and allow to cook for a minute or two. When the skillet seems dry, add the chicken stock, stir, turn the heat to medium-high, cover and allow to cook for about five minutes. After, remove the lid, turn the heat back up to high and continue to cook until the fennel gently begins to caramelize. Remove from the heat, add the lemon juice, lemon zest and cracked black pepper. Serves 4.

Save

Brussel Sprouts with Tamari Fish Sauce Glaze

Brussel Sprouts with Tamari Fish Sauce Glaze

ilovefishsauce

Don’t you worry, I have quite the post lined up for when I make my own fish sauce. It’s something I’ve been wanting to make for years, yet the slimy, fish head-y opportunity hasn’t risen quite yet. Never fear! Store-bought fish sauce lends itself delightfully to vegetables. I know. Stay with me. And don’t be put off by the mention of mint, either! Try this dish out–you very well may have almost all the ingredients hanging around your kitchen. That’s all I can say right now.

Fish Saucey Brussels Sprouts
1 pound Brussels sprouts, ends removed and chopped in half
2 tablespoons coconut oil
1 tablespoon wheat-free tamari (or if you’re soy free, coconut aminos instead)
1 tablespoon heat of your choice (I used some fermented chile paste, but anything like sriracha is great, or fresh chopped spicy peppers too)
2 teaspoons fish sauce
2 teaspoons apple cider or rice vinegar
1 teaspoon maple syrup (completely optional)
2 cloves garlic, minced and mashed
1/2 inch knob of peeled ginger, minced

chives or green onions, minced (optional)
mint, finely sliced (optional, but trust me)
cilantro, finely chopped (optional)

Place a large skillet with the coconut oil over medium-high heat. When oil is nice and hot, add the Brussels sprouts. Stir a few times and allow to cook for a few minutes. Meanwhile, combine the rest of the ingredients up through the ginger in a small bowl and stir to combine. Turn heat up to high and dump the liquid mixture over the Brussels sprouts. Continue to cook and stir for another five minutes, or until sticky and caramelized. Plate and serve with the three herbs as garnish. Serves 2.

Save

The Easiest Baked Potato

The Easiest Baked Potato

bakedpotato650

Looking for the perfect baked sweet potato? The Freckled Foodie has got your back. Looking for the perfect baked potato? Well, hello! When you find yourself with pounds of potatoes, a cool rainy day and a week of meals to prep, these could fit right in. There’s a lot you can do with a baked potato once cooled–peeled and grated for hash browns, cubed for hash, reheated, peeled and mashed with butter and cream, mashed and mixed with an egg for potato pancakes… or sliced and fried in the fat of your choice. Starchy options = endless.

Baked Potato
10 large russet potatoes, clean and dry
butter, olive oil or bacon fat
flaked sea salt
black pepper

Take oven rack out and set on counter, then preheat oven to 400. Pierce the skin of each potato a few times on each side with the tip of a knife or the tines of a fork. Rub potatoes all over with the fat of your choice (oh, and don’t let me limit you. Did you save those chorizo drippings? Lard? Duck fat?) and set on the oven rack. Sprinkle generously with flaked sea salt and grind profusely with black pepper. Place oven rack in the middle of the oven, and bake for 1 hour.

Save

Beet Carpaccio

Beet Carpaccio

beetcarpaccio2large
Lucia here: today’s post is co-written by my good friend Amy K, a practicing acupuncturist who is very knowledgeable in traditional Chinese medicine. I’ve learned a lot from her and we have a three-part series of posts we’ve written together to welcome springtime!

As the days get a little longer and the sun shines a bit brighter, signs of spring are popping up all around us (well, aside from that pesky snowstorm the other day). Little green shoots of plant-life are peeking up and out from the earth, awakening from their long winter slumber, and starting to stretch their leaves to the sky.

In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), springtime is ruled by the wood element. (What are the five elements? Find out here!)

Think of the wood element as new signs of life. The energy of the world is rising up and out, ready for a fresh start – a rebirth if you will. This energy is reflected in all of us this time of year – that undeniable urge to go outside and get your hands dirty in the garden, start a new project, or get the dust-rag out for some spring-cleaning.

While all that rising energy is great when you have a to-do list the length of your arm, it can sometimes rise too quickly and lead to trouble. Typical signs of an over controlling wood element are:

  • perpetual irritability or anger
  • migraines
  • insomnia
  • red, painful eyes

On the other hand, if the wood element in a person isn’t strong enough, they might exhibit any of these signs:

  • mild dizziness
  • blurred vision
  • muscle twitches
  • light menstrual flow

The wood element is energetically related to the liver. The liver not only rids our body of toxins we ingest and inhale, but according to TCM, the liver also does the heavy lifting of detoxifying our emotions–what a powerhouse! Wanna know one of my favorite ways to balance the wood element and give my liver the help it so truly deserves?

Eating beets!

beetcarpaccio3large

All foods have different energetic properties that help categorize them into one of the five elements. Have you ever noticed the beautiful pattern of rings in a cut beet? The similarities between the cross-sections of beets and tree trunks are astonishing. Beets are practically shouting their association with the wood element from the rooftop!

To help keep your wood element in balance this spring, Lucia and I will be sharing with you three delicious and nutritious recipes over the next few weeks using the grandmother of all wood element foods: the mighty beet.

Processed with VSCOcam with g3 preset

Beet Carpaccio with Grapefruit Vinaigrette
Salad Ingredients
1 medium beet
1 grapefruit
2-3 ounces fresh goat cheese
1 tablespoon fresh dill
1 tablespoon green onions
freshly cracked black or white pepper

After washing and peeling your beet, use a mandoline to very, very thinly slice the beet into delicate wafers. Set aside slices. Now, cut both ends off the grapefruit and sit the grapefruit upright. Using your knife, cut away all the rind and white pith. With care, you will now supreme the grapefruit, cutting along the side of each segment until all have been released from the core. Squeeze the remaining grapefruit innards into a bowl–this will be for your vinaigrette. On a large plate, begin arranging your beet slices, topping with the grapefruit segments. Drop dollops of the goat cheese on top, drizzle the vinaigrette (see below) and scissor or chop some fresh dill tops and green onions over as well. Finish with a crack or two of fresh black pepper.

Vinaigrette Ingredients
¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
¼ cup grapefruit juice
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar (or lemon juice)
½ teaspoon sea salt
1 tablespoon fresh dill, roughly chopped

Combine all ingredients in a bowl and whisk until combined. Taste and adjust seasonings if needed (this will depend on the sweetness and acidity of your grapefruit).

Save

Roasted Cabbage with Cracked Caraway and Coriander

Roasted Cabbage with Cracked Caraway and Coriander

roastedcabbagelarge

Oh, “whoops”… it’s another cabbage recipe. This time the big ol’ thing is sliced into large rounds, pampered with oils and spices and shown to the oven. Allow myself to… introduce myself, sweet roasted planks of veg. You are so good to me!

Roasted Cabbage with Cracked Caraway and Coriander
1 head cabbage
3-4 tablespoons oil or fat of your choice (I… again… used melted bacon fat. olive oil, coconut oil, butter or lard are all options!)
1 tablespoon coriander seeds
1 tablespoon caraway seeds
1 tablespoon sea salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
lemon wedges

Preheat the oven to 400 degree. Lightly oil two baking sheets with the oil/fat of your choice. Either in a spice grinder, a ziplock baggie or a pestle and mortar, gently grind the spices, salt and pepper until all the spices are cracked. With a large knife and steady hand, slice the head of cabbage into large rounds, from top to bottom (so each slice has a bit of the core at the bottom to help it stay together). Place rounds on the baking trays and oil each. Generously sprinkle each round with the spice mixture and pop the trays in the oven for 35 minutes or until golden brown. Serve with the lemon wedges and allow your dining patrons to take fate into their own hands. Serves 4.

Save